Disability, Torture and Human Rights

Today is Human Rights Day and this year’s slogan, Human Rights 365, “encompasses the idea that every day is Human Rights Day’.  These are principles of equality, fairness, dignity and respect which human beings aspire to – and which nations sign up to in the various Declarations.

I love Article One

  • All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.

and Article Five ‘

  • No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

However, according to this article some of the methods of torture include things that some disable people experience:

1. Denying access to the toilet so that people who had their movement restricted were forced to urinate and defecate over themselves was described as a degrading element of torture.

But it’s ok for an immobile person to lay unable to move in a urine soaked bed or chair because they don’t have access to care or equipment?

2. Being restrained in painful positions for long periods or being forced into ‘unnatural positions for extended periods’ is a method of torture.

Having to sit in a wheelchair, because of a severe impairment,  (or lay in a bed) that forces your back or limbs out at the wrong angle to cause nerve pain, pressure sores, dislocations etc is torture – yet people are in these positions for what could be years, with no pain relief, waiting for appropriate support/equipment/assessments. You may never experience a life without pain if you live in a country that doesn’t provide equipment. A pain where the only relief is death.

When your body is already twisted and contracted and placed in a position where you are not supported – the weight of your   body pulling against other body parts that refuse to stretch from their contracted state is like being on a rack. The agony is indescribable.

3. Sleep deprivation is defined as a method of torture.

Poor pain relief, pressure relief and postural support for disabled people can cause extreme sleep deprivation that brings on cognitive problems, hallucinations, memory loss, communication loss and many problems. Carers who might only get a few hours sleep experience sleep deprivation – night after night, month after month – yet this torture is ignored.

Where are our rights?

So spare a thought for the elderly neighbour, disabled friend, the person being the closed curtains who can’t leave their home …. because torture isn’t just the experience of terrorists or prisoners … it’s happening in our streets, in the UK, every day of the year and it’s not going to stop until it’s recognised.

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