Updated list of key shrimp keeping articles

Updated list of articles about keeping shrimp, from this blog. I have over 22,000 readers and 200 followers on Facebook.

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Maintaining your shrimp tank.

Once you are up and running, you will occasionally have to maintain the conditions in your tank to keep shrimp healthy.


My tank glass is covered in algae

My fish tank is algae free on the glass walls. My shrimp tank … not so much!!!

The cause in my case was 

  1. direct sunlight 
  2. build up of Nitrate
  3. No filter cleaning

So, I used a metal blade tank scraper to clean the algae of the sides. Did a third water change (re mineralised rain water), and cleaned out the filter (put in some new filter pads/wool). I also cleaned out the cooler to maximise its effectiveness for the hot days when it will be working hard to keep my shrimps cool. 

If your tank is balanced (cycling well to keep Nitrite at zero and water changes to take out Nitrates) , your glass may stay totally clear. To help, Nerite snails will keep it clean but they don’t like low PH/acidic water so they may not be an option for shrimps that like low Ph water. 

Water changes

Some people do it daily, others weekly or even monthly. Some people take out a third water, others 50% or more.

Personally I do two checks to decide on what to do.

  1. How is my TDS?
  2. How are my Nitrates?
  3. How does it look!

If my TDS reading is a little high and the water is low from evaporation, I just top up with filtered rainwater. If it needs a big top up I add mineral powder. 

If my Nitrates are high (and algae is blooming) both are indicators for a good 25-50% water change. I re mineralise and make sure the water temperature is not going to dramatically change.

My shrimp are observed – irrational/frantic swimming can indicate the change is too much from what they have become used to … so slowly does it.  

Filter maintenance 

I have an external canister filter and an internal filter that came as a single unit. The internal filter sponge needs washing out monthly and the spray bar weekly. (Dental floss brushes are great for cleaning the nozzles). 

The external canister gets done yearly. 

Never throw out all your filter medium. Inside the canister are two sponges and the ‘stones’ which hold the good bacteria that keep your tank cycling. The sponges can be easily and cheaply changed or even washed out. The stones I change every 12-18 months – but only half of them. Don’t throw away your stones or your nitrogen cycle will reduce or stop! Never wash out your stones.

Here is my filter sponge!! Totally black and decayed. No wonder it wasn’t working.

I tipped out the filter stone medium and sieved out the black water. I then replaced them back into the filter. You don’t want to leave your stones out of water for very long  because the bacteria could die.

Anyone for coco pops?


Cooler maintenance 

Every year the cooler gets flushed out with tap water and reflushed with rain water. This pushes the slurry out of the unit and gets it working efficiently for the hot summer days. It’s an expensive bit of equipment so I want it to last. 

Soil changes

I never change the soil. Nutrients may deplete but my tank is a living tank with live plants and shrimp/snail poo which are also giving nutrients into the soil and water as well as taking them. The plants are healthy so I’ll take that as confirmation all is well.

Plant trimming

If you have live plants and good conditions they may grow like crazy! I have some aquascaping tweezers and sharp scissors to prune my plants. In the summer this might be weekly. 

Hygiene

If your hands are submerged most of the time, wear pond gloves to avoid transmitting poisons to your tank and being poisoned by bacteria etc in the tank. Wash your hands thoroughly afterwards. 

Other

Avoid over feeding shrimp so that food build up doesn’t accumulate for algae to flourish. 


All clean and looking much better.

Shrimp gift card holders

Shrimp design gift card holder / money holder.

Available to purchase in the UK for £2.00 plus p&p from my shop. Show me this gift on Etsy. Please contact me to order packs for re-sale.

All profits go to raise funds for adults living with Muscular Dystrophy in the UK.

Contents

A luxury gift card or money holder with ribbon fastener. Hand painted, wooden shrimp embellishment. Heavy weight premium card. Includes one blank voucher insert of a matching colour.

Choose from: Red Cherry, Snowball, Blue Dream, Crystal Red Bee or Blue Panda Taiwan Bee.

Shown here on a wood background. Also available in sand, earth and leaves.

Perfect for:

  • presenting a purchased aquatic store gift card in a more personalised way. 

OR

Use the provided blank insert to …

  • present a gift where you might only have an Internet gift voucher code and nothing physical to give.
  • write your own personalised vouchers or coupons for friends/family to redeem. Eg ‘I will buy you a new shrimp tank of your choice’.

Ships in 1-2 weeks due to being hand made to order, first class. 

Buy more than one and just pay one postage fee.

Review: Floating/submerged moss ball

Not all moss ball ‘kits’ are the same.  Let’s look at products from two eBay retailers (both importing from China).

  
These plastic domes are filled with a fine layer of aquatic moss to create either a floating or floor ball. Only a table spoon of moss is needed for each ball (no room for much more).

First up – from ‘plantsforyourtank’ – £4.49 plus postage.

I ordered the floor version. It comes with filled with small balls of fertiliser. I removed these (the golden rule of don’t put it in the tank if you don’t know what exactly it is).

The ball comes in 3 parts. A plastic mesh cover which has a spike to push this basket outer layer onto a preformed dome shape (and the hollow dome has a base which un screws). I replaced the fertiliser with larva rock fragments. It felt pretty heavy but I still had to anchor it in my tank as it floated.

It was easy to use and held together well.

  
 I ordered 2 more from ‘sseariver2009’ – in the floating version as I could get 2 for £4.99.

However, these were disappointing.

First of all, the picture showed the weights to be glass beads (inert and safe for tanks) [top of picture below]. They were actually metal engraved coins (bottom of the picture was my kit). I would never risk unknown metal of this nature in my tank). The plastic was poorly fitting and very difficult to put together. Overall, poor quality.

 
  
I will let you know how well they grow or if the moss just rots.

Beginner FAQ

  
Starting With Shrimp

The most common questions from new shrimp keepers – part 1.

FAQ Volume 1 – general

Q1. What do I need to keep shrimp?

That will depend on which type you keep. Each variety comes from different places around the world and have adapted to different conditions. Fresh water shrimp need to have these conditions replicated to thrive. Generally you will need:

  1. A tank – the bigger the better (easier to look after).
  2. Tap water that has been treated to remove chlorine/chloramine or ‘pure water’ eg rain/spring that you will add shrimp minerals to.
  3. A cycled tank
  4. Some plants/moss and substrate (gravel or  shrimp soil)
  5. All round shrimp food to give them all the nutrients they need.
  6. Heater or a cooler to maintain a stable temperature.

General care will include small water changes, feeding and glass cleaning (and possibly plant pruning).


Q2: Can you identify this shrimp.

It is not wise to put shrimp in any tank if you don’t know what type they are. There are many types of shrimp and each require different habitats and water conditions.  To place them in the wrong conditions could harm or kill them. 

Tip: If you don’t know what type it is, don’t buy it or take it from the wild. 

Q3.  I have a tank with fish, which shrimp should I get?

Firstly, find out what water conditions your fish live in. Shrimp can live with small, peaceful fish but consider these points:

  • Fish eat adult shrimp and love eating baby shrimp.
  • Shrimp will hide from fish so you might not see them for months at a time.
  • If the fish can fit the shrimp in their mouth they will eat them.
  • Tropical aquariums usually run at 25-28 degrees – shrimp prefer around 22-23 degree temperatures and will cook at around 30!
  • Shrimp water conditions should match what is also good for your fish.
  • Shrimp have a low tolerance to change in conditions and you won’t be able to treat fish illness with some medications as they can kill invertebrates.

Q4. My shrimp came in a sealed echo sphere/closed habitat but they are dying. What should I do.

Sealed units are usually a death trap and pretty cruel. Companies tell people they are self sustaining ecosystems – but they deprive shrimp of  natural behaviours, access to foraging, access to varied foods, deprive them from breeding behaviours and shorten their life considerably. It may be impossible to find out the exact breed of shrimp to know what conditions to keep them in (usually a salt water variety) to set up a proper tank. Inability to maintain an optimum temperature can be a killer – so you might want to see if this is the problem. It might be that an infection is present, not enough oxygen being made, ammonia build up from decaying organisms, lack of algae to eat. Sadly there is no way to help organisms in a sealed unit.

Some advanced keepers make their own sealed habitats but it’s not for beginners and I would argue, not good for shrimp welfare.

  
Q5. I put my cherry shrimp in my tank. They began to swim frantically then by the next morning most were dead. What went wrong?

Did you set up a drip to gradually get them used to their new water over 2-5 hours? If not then the cause could be stress. Other causes could be a tank with ammonia in the water or high concentrations of Copper or  chemicals. Did you put your hands in the water – residues of soap, detergent, creams etc can cause deaths.  Did you put them in spring/bottled/RO water without re-mineralising it?

A mass of shrimp deaths can cause an ammonia spike if left to decay and harm or kill the established residents.

Do a 50% water change, gradually lower the temperature to a stable 20-21 and remove all dead animals.

Q6. How big should my tank be?

If this is your first go at keeping shrimp, the general rule is the bigger the tank, the easier it will be. 28-35 litres is a good starter size.  You want this to be fun – not hard work!

Q7. Do I need a filter?

You will need a filter to house ‘good’ bacteria, circulate nutrients/minerals/oxygen and clean your water – a sponge one inside your tank or an external filter (with mesh over the intake pipe).

Q8. Do I need a heater or a cooler.

Shrimp do not tolerate changes in temperature and if your water gets above 26 they can struggle to survive. Above 30 degrees and they will cook. Equally, drops to below 20-23 and they will breed and swim less. So you will need to stabilise temperature. 

Q9. How often do I clean and feed them?

I only do extra water changes if my TDS has increased. Some people do a 20% or 50% change weekly! People have different opinions. For a shrimp only tank, I do 15% approximately every 6 weeks and feed as much as they can consume in 1-2 hours (all round shrimp food), every 2 days.

Making a new planted tank

  
Yesterday was an exciting day. After 3 months of buying all new stuff – the day to create my new fish tank had arrived.

I’m writing about how easy it was to do because it’s exactly the same whether you put fish or shrimp in it. I hope it might inspire you to care for a beautiful aquarium too!

Step one

Research what you need and get everything ready. Over the course of 3 months I bought:

  • 50 litre tank (Dennerle)
  • External filter (Eheim 150)
  • Scrapers soil (Dennerle)
  • 2 Lights (Leddy Smart Plant LED)
  • Heater (Tetra)
  • 1 unit to put the tank on.

The day before we connected up the filter and added an additional plug socket  in the wall. The empty aquarium had already been pre filled and emptied to check for leaks. The light and heater were added.

We had also collected 5 X 10 litre tubs of rainwater and filtered it through our home made filter station.

So this is how we looked the night before if you ignore the moist soil!

 

Step 2

On the day it took about 4 hrs to complete. We re -mineralised the rainwater and poured it into the soil until it started to pool. We then landscaped it – less at the front and higher into the back for perspective.

Step 3

Now for the fun bit. I already had wood planted up with a variety of plants that was in the fish tank. Basically I glued rhizome plants on the wood.  So that came out of the fish tank.

I also had some spare pieces of Dragon Stone (About Dragon Stone) and some green slate paddle stone from the outdoor pond. Paddle stone is slate which has been tumbled smooth to look like rock that has been washed by a river for decades. 

I washed it several times in a high vinegar to water ratio. This removed dust and tested for fizzing. If a rock fizzes when acid is poured on it this indicates carbonate is present which will increase pH. Vinegar isn’t a strong acid so it’s not the best test but the only thing I had to hand. It did fizz slightly so I will use with caution and check the pH. I can always take them out.

  
Next I took out masses of Pogostemon (See blog page About Pogostemon) from my shrimp tank. I also took out all their moss which had taken over and not stayed attached to any wood where I glued it!

 Now it was just a case of arranging it in the new tank.

I kept tall plants to the back (Pogostemon) wood plants in the front but away from touching the glass as much as possible. 

These are some overhead pictures before the water went in.

   
 
I also played around with some moss- more about that in another blog post.

Step 4

Next we added re-mineralised water very slowly so as to not disturb the soil or plants. 

 
About an hour later it was complete.

  
The filter was turned on, heater and thermometer used, spray bar adjusted and voilà! The filter is totally silent – superb. Plants have a good  sway to them and the water is crystal clear thanks to gentle pouring of water and polishing from added Purigen.

Bacteria were added, the soil has ammonia so just letting it cycle now for 4-6 weeks or until it’s balanced. Then it’s ready for aquatic animals.