Plymouth Aquarium: Turtle + fish = good times.

IMG_2955My Trip Advisor Review is here.

If you find it helpful – give me a helpful vote on my profile. Always good to know if it was useful ūüėČ

Want to visit an aquarium that’s got good access, good food and easy viewing – then this is the one for you.

If you’re looking for a¬†‘shark tunnel’ and want to touch stingrays – try somewhere else.

If you want a stuffed toy choice of every sea creature imaginable – the gift shop will appeal.

If you’re planning a Sharknado party – this is the place to stock up on¬†all things shark.

If you want to wait 20 minutes for the¬†Sea Turtle to wake up from it’s regular snooze and swim¬†into view for a few minutes, then this challenge is¬†for you.

Remember folks …. Fish are Friends …. and plastic bags kill our sea life. (Yes you will be told this several times on your way round :-p … although¬†your stuffed toy may well be offered in a plastic¬†bag to carry home).

Advertisements

No room at the Inn – well no bed to be precise.

About 9 months ago the dates for the Firework Championships were announced¬†– so we¬†quickly booked¬†into¬†the Holiday Inn,¬†Plymouth. I’ve written a separate blog post on our holiday.

We had chosen the Holiday Inn based on personal and practical requirements. The location meant we could walk to see the fireworks, it had parking and was one of the few places to have air con (as I need to keep the air cool because of my ventilator mask which otherwise gets really hot and uncomfortable)

At the time of booking the only wheelchair accessible room available was one with a double bed.

Out of 211 rooms there are only 2 with wide doors etc and a larger bathroom for wheelchair users which is rather poor. The chances of getting a twin room in hotels with so few rooms are slim.

 

We made the wrong assumption

 

bed

 

When we have stayed at other similar places (Premier Inn, Travel Lodge and even other Holiday Inns etc) where we can only get a double bed, we have been offered a camp / folding bed or sofa bed.

I have to take my pressure¬†relief¬†mattresses, turning equipment that goes under the mattress etc and I use a ventilator – so sleeping in a double bed with my husband isn’t an option. However, he has to be next to me to make sure I’m ok and to help me during the night.

Just before we went I spoke to them on the phone to ask for the folding bed and was told¬†they had a policy not to provide¬†these.¬†Also, if we wanted second room for a carer (which wasn’t adjoining through an internal door,¬†so wouldn’t have been any good for us anyway) we’d have to pay for it.

 

 

Making it possible to stay for work or leisure

Hotels¬†have to make ‘reasonable’ adjustment, under UK ¬†equality law, ¬†to enable disabled guests to use their services – including providing aids and equipment. I’m assuming this is why the portable bed is often provided for carers in other places.

Another example is that if a person can not use the bath they can request a bath lift at one of the major hotel chains. Another chain offers low beds that can be raised on blocks to suit different height requirements.  It can make the difference between going or not going on holiday.

Also, it’s not only holidays that are the problem, ¬†I’ve been to many hotels in the past for business trips, attending¬†conferences or running training events for my company – and it really made working life difficult.

Basically, affordable, portable equipment that can help a range of guests have a much better stay are one of the things they can do for customers.

An apology

Holiday Inn isn’t cheap, we didn’t want to pay double and we needed and wanted¬†to sleep near each other. My husband didn’t want to sleep on the floor – so on principle we felt unwanted and cancelled – moving to the Future Inn.

Since then, we have had an apology from Holiday Inn after I made a complaint. The manager was very polite and wrote in detail about the facilities they do have and the training provided for staff. He also explained that they do have a policy of offering a free room for carers and will consider a portable bed.  I hope this is a real genuine consideration.

I would like them to understand that things like a portable bed would have made all the difference and is better than the other option of us taking a camp bed or my husband sleeping on the floor.

I suspect many other people are in the same boat as us (from what my friends have been saying)¬†and I know some wheelchair users¬†who sleep in their chairs because of the ‘bed’ problem. It’s hard finding accommodation when most hotels only make 1% of their rooms wheelchair accessible.

Access for people with mobility impairments is more than wide doors and a few grab rails – its also about giving accurate information so that people can decided where they want to spend there money. We need a higher proportion of accessible rooms to choose from – that have been designed¬†in a way that will benefit a wider proportion of disabled guests – not just mobile wheelchair users who don’t need assistance.